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At the Movies 17

Week 5: The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe

Week 5: The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe

At the Movies is a series we do every year where we explore the Biblical truths we find in Hollywood movies.  So break out the popcorn.  It’s going to be an adventure!


Introduction

Note to Leaders: Watching this video is optional, but it may help give context to people who have not seen the movie or were not able to be at church.

CS Lewis—author of The Chronicles of Narnia—was born and raised in the church of Ireland, but at the age of 15 he declared himself to be an atheist.  He decided faith was way too hard, way too difficult, and anything this difficult actually showed there is no God.  He found no life in it, no joy in it and walked away from his faith.

In his late twenties, CS Lewis met JRR Tolkien—author of Lord of the Rings—and Tolkien influenced Lewis’s life toward Christ.  Lewis spent a couple of years examining the truths of Christianity, and then at the age of 31 he had a real encounter with Christ and gave his heart to Jesus.  Later in life Lewis penned an autobiography, Surprised by Joy. The real turning point for Lewis was discovering just how much joy there was in following Jesus.

How did you meet your best friend (besides your spouse), and why did you hit it off so well?

What do you think about the idea that there is joy to be found in following Jesus?  Does that resonate with your own experience?


Understanding

Have a volunteer read Ephesians 4:18.

A lot of people have a wrong view of God, but if you could understand God’s ways, just like CS Lewis did, you’d be surprised by joy.

The Chronicles of Narnia is a beautiful picture of God’s story.  His story begins with the creation of humanity.  God created human beings because He wanted a family.  He already had servants in the form of angels, but God wanted something much better than that.  He wanted real, intimate relationships.

So God created human beings with the ability to choose Him or not choose Him.  Some have chosen Him, and some have gone their own way.  But to have a family of people who wanted to be in relationship with Him, God had to give them that choice.

The challenges that we face are the result of human beings choosing to write a different story than the one God wanted to write.  They’re the result of people choosing not to follow God’s plan.

  • When is one time you felt truly loved, and what made that experience so special?

Have a volunteer read 2 Corinthians 11:14 and John 8:44.

The Chronicles of Narnia was supposed to be a love story of God’s plan for a family, the two sons of Adam and the two daughters of Eve, but the story gets interrupted when one of them, Edwin, gets seduced by the devil and turns his back on God’s story.

The same thing happens in our lives.  Satan tempts us away from God’s plan by telling us something that simply isn’t true.  He’ll promise you everything and then immediately betray you.

He always offers something that looks good, tastes good, feels good, seems good, something that makes us think that whatever Satan is offering is better than what God has for us.

But while what Satan offers may look good on the surface, the truth is they’re not good.  The tragedy is that every time we fall for that bait, we end up in bondage as a prisoner to evil.  It may not happen immediately, but every time we go our own way, we always end up in chains, bondage, and darkness.  It has been said, “Sin will take us further than we wanted to go.  Keep us longer than we wanted to stay.  Cost us more than we wanted to pay.”

  • What are some of the ways that you have seen sin imprison people?

Have volunteers read Romans 3:23, Romans 6:23, and Hebrews 9:22.

Death is the inevitable end game of sin.  God is the source of all life, and sin cuts us off from God.  Sin is choosing to turn from God and pursue our own way, our own story.  And once sin enters the picture, no amount of regret or money or good deeds can undo it.  The only way to pay for sin is death.

But God said, “I still really want you, even though you didn’t want me.”  And so instead of us paying for our own sin with our lives, Jesus—God Himself—decided to come and give His life on the cross to pay our debt.

Sometimes people question how a loving God could send people to hell, but God doesn’t send anyone to hell.  Hell is just the place where you can pay your own bill if you so choose. But God didn’t want you to do that.  Instead He wanted to come into you life and give you a way of escape by paying for your sin.

  • When is a time someone has helped you out of a difficult situation without expecting you to give him or her anything in return?

  • Jesus’ sacrifice calls us to respond. First by accepting the forgiveness, the payment for our wrongdoing, that He offers, and second by showing that same type of selfless love to others.  What is one thing you can do differently this week to place the needs of someone else ahead of your own needs?

Hopefully you’ve understood the God story and will open up your mind and your heart to God’s power and God’s love for your life.  John chapter 1 out pretty clearly that to those who receive Him, to those who would believe on His name, to those who would actually invite God back into their hearts and lives, He would give the right to be a child of God.  That’s what God’s desire is for your life.

There are three types of people who are a part of Eastside small groups.

Some of you haven’t made a decision to follow Jesus.  There’s something that keeps you from doing so: maybe it’s fear or questions or past experience or your view of God.  You might feel far from God and be searching for the way back.

Some of you have decided to follow Jesus, but you still feel far from God right now.  There’s something that’s getting in the way of your friendship with God.  It could be ongoing sin. It could be simply not spending time with God.  Again, it could be past hurts or experiences.

Some of you have decided to follow Jesus, and you feel God’s presence in your lives.  You’re not perfect—far from it—but you’re pursuing friendship with God.

No one should judge anyone else based on which category that person is in, and no one should feel judged.  This isn’t about being a better person or a worse person: we’re all sinners.  This is about allowing God to work in us  and being able to enjoy the love, joy, and peace that come from God when we decide to live our lives as a part of His story and His family.

  • Which type of person are you right now?  If you’re one of the first two types, what would need to change for you to continue moving forward in your spiritual journey?  If you’re in the third category, how did you get there, and how can you sustain your relationship with God?

Note to Leaders: If someone is in your group who has not been a follower of Jesus and is ready to take that step, pray with them something like the following.  The easiest way is probably for you to pray a line and have that person repeat it after you.

God, today I want to enter Your story.  I thank you for coming to earth through Jesus to enter my story.  And today I understand that Jesus made a substitute payment for me so that I wouldn’t have to pay for my wrongdoing. I receive the payment Jesus made for me by dying on a cross. Jesus died for me and I want to live for him.

If someone in your group has made a decision to follow Jesus, please let us know by reaching out to Will at wjohnston@eastside.com.  We would love to resource that person as they being their spiritual journey.


Personal Activity

Last week we asked you to commit to praying for 30 days for the person closest to you who doesn’t know Jesus.  If you haven’t already done that, we would encourage you to start.  If you have, keep up the good work!

As you’re praying for the person, ask God to provide an opportunity for you to have a faith conversation with the person.

And remember, you don’t have to have a marathon prayer session every day.  You want to do more than just a quick, “God, be with her…” as you’re falling asleep, but you need only set aside two or three minutes each day.  (Although you can obviously pray longer if you’d like.)

However long you intend to pray, pick a specific time at which you will do it (right after you get up, at lunch, during your drive home, right after you go to bed, etc.).  We do the things we plan to do, not the things we intend to do.


Group Activity

We unleash compassion all year long, but on Saturday, March 4 we're coming together for a Serve Day to share the love of Jesus with the lost and hurting in our communities in some very practical and tangible ways.

We would challenge you to consider serving together as a group.  You’ll not only get the opportunity to make a difference in your community, we can just about guarantee you’ll get to know one another better as you serve shoulder-to-shoulder.

For a full list of projects and to sign up, visit eastside.com/serveday.

Week 4 - The Martian

Week 4 - The Martian

At the Movies is a series we do every year where we explore the Biblical truths we find in Hollywood movies.  So break out the popcorn.  It’s going to be an adventure!


Introduction

Note to Leaders: Watching this video is optional, but it may help give context to people who have not seen the movie or were not able to be at church.

The Martian is a science fiction film based on Andy Weir's novel by the same name. On November 25, 2035, the crew of the Ares III manned mission to Mars encounters an unexpected strong dust storm that threatens to topple their Mars Ascent Vehicle or MAV, forcing them to hastily leave the planet. During the evacuation, astronaut Mark Watney, played by Damon, is struck by debris and lost in the storm.  The last signal from his spacesuit indicates no signs of life. With Watney believed dead, and the storm worsening by the second, mission commander Melissa Lewis orders the remaining crew to return to their orbiting vessel Hermes without him.

  • What is the scariest natural phenomenon you have ever experienced (earthquake, hurricane, tornado, storm at sea, etc.)?

Have a volunteer read Psalm 23.

The Martian is a story about just how far people will go to save someone who they’ve lost.  It reminds us of the incredible lengths that God goes to save us: coming as Jesus to show us the way back to God, dying on a cross to pay for the things we have done wrong, and pursuing us in so many big and small ways throughout our lives.

Verse six of Psalm 23 says, “Surely your goodness and love will follow me all the days of my life…” (NIV), but the word we often translate follow had a much stronger sense in the original Hebrew.  It meant to hunt or to pursue.  It’s as if David was saying of God,  “Surely your goodness and love will hunt me down all of the days of my life.”

  • How does the idea that God pursues us, that His goodness and love hunt us down, impact the way you view God?

Have a volunteer read 1 Corinthians 9:22.

If we’re going to love God, we have to love the people He loves. That’s why as long as there is one lost person in the world – our goal at Eastside is going to be to grow – because every person matters to God.  That’s why we continue to look for creative ways to explain the Gospel of Jesus. That’s why we pray for people who are spiritually lost.  It’s why invite them to attend, do multiple services, and start more campuses. We never stop looking for one lost person because God never stops looking for us.

So what do we do? We continually put ourselves in the shoes of those who are far from God – trying to understand what they are going through – so we can do everything we can to rescue them. So how do we do that? By trying to understand how people far from God really feel. Many are like Mark Watney – life dealt them a tough blow and now they find themselves in situations they don’t want to be in – trapped with seemingly no way out – just trying to survive.

  • When is one time you’ve felt trapped by your circumstances?  How did you deal with that?  Or, perhaps, how are you dealing with that?

  • Those of us who have followed Jesus for a long time often find it hard to understand what it is like to not follow Jesus.  What is one practical thing you can do to better understand and empathize with people who are far from God?

Have a volunteer read Romans 10:14.

In The Martian, when everyone hears that Mark is dead, they gasp.  But in the Church today that’s not how everyone responds.  Sometimes we become immune and unmoved by the fact that there are lost people around us are dying without the hope of Jesus and the promise of heaven.

That’s why we should never worry if the church is getting too big. Hell is getting too big, and too many people who’ve never understood the love and grace of God are going there.  In Jesus’ day many even criticized Him for going after those who were lost and dying – those who were far from God.

The biography of Jesus written by Luke the physician says the crowd muttered because Jesus was focusing His whole life on lost and dying people. Jesus would say things like, “It’s not the healthy that need a doctor, but the sick.” In another chapter Jesus said that He came for one reason: to seek and to save the lost.

And now we, His people and His Church, have that same mission. The Church exists to continue the mission and ministry of Jesus. This is our #1 priority.

So how do we help people see how good God really is? Well of course we pray, but we also have to mobilize ourselves in such a way that we continually go on rescue missions. And it’s not easy – there’s always a cost involved. In fact, to do anything that matters, you have to lay something else down. 

  • What in your life has taken precedence over the mission that Jesus gave us to pursue those who are lost?  How do you need to reprioritize your life in order to rectify this?

In The Martian, it’s people who were already tired and ready to get back home who decide to turn around – risk everything – and go try to rescue Mark.  We need to do the same thing. We ought to continually count the cost, pay the price, and risk it all: to do everything we can to rescue just one more person.

We need to make the decision to find someone lost and help them, and be a light of hope for them.  We can encourage those who are down, pray for those who are hurting, listen to those who feel alone, invite those who need a word of hope.

You can’t do everything.  But you can do something.  You may not be able to help everyone. But you can help someone.  Everywhere you look there are people who need your help and the hope that only Jesus can give.

We all know people who need to experience the love of Jesus.  They need His grace, His mercy, His freedom, His salvation. We never stop searching, because our heavenly Father never stops searching for us.

  • Who is the person closest to you who doesn’t know Jesus?

  • Spend some time as group praying for those people.  Ask God to reveal himself to them.  Ask God to give you opportunities to love them, to share Jesus with them, and to invite them to church.


Personal Activity

Commit to praying for this person every day for the next 30 days.  You don’t have to have a marathon prayer session every day.  You want to do more than just a quick, “God, be with her…” as you’re falling asleep, but you need only set aside two or three minutes each day.  (Although you can obviously pray longer if you’d like.)

However long you intend to pray, pick a specific time at which you will do it (right after you get up, at lunch, during your drive home, right after you go to bed, etc.).  We do the things we plan to do, not the things we intend to do


Group Activity

We unleash compassion all year long, but on Saturday, March 4 we're coming together for a Serve Day to share the love of Jesus with the lost and hurting in our communities in some very practical and tangible ways

We would challenge you to consider serving together as a group.  You’ll not only get the opportunity to make a difference in your community, we can just about guarantee you’ll get to know one another better as you serve shoulder-to-shoulder.

For a full list of projects and to sign up, visit eastside.com/serveday.

Week 3 - Still Alice

Week 3 - Still Alice

At the Movies is a series we do every year where we explore the Biblical truths we find in Hollywood movies. So break out the popcorn.  It’s going to be an adventure!


Introduction

Note to Leaders: Watching this video is optional, but it may help give context to people who have not seen the movie or were not able to be at church.

Still Alice is a love story you won’t soon forget. Julianne Moore plays the part of Dr. Alice Howland, a highly acclaimed linguistics professor at Columbia University in New York.  She has a thriving marriage with her husband John, a doctor played by Alex Baldwin, and her 3 grown children. The movie begins on a very festive note because it’s Alice’s 50th birthday and the family is celebrating this joyful occasion.  But unbeknownst to Alice and the family she loves, Alice is sick.  And her life is about to change dramatically.

  • Who is your best friend (other than your spouse), and what makes you like him or her so much?

Have a volunteer read James 4:13-14.

Alice’s whole life is defined by words and language, but because of early onset Alzheimer’s, she loses her ability to engage well with the very thing that defined her.  She and those who love her undertake a very difficult journey.   You may be in a similar season right now. Someone you love is fighting some kind of disease: Alzheimer’s, cancer, Lou Gehrig’s, Parkinson’s, AIDS…

  • What is one thing that has happened in your life that has changed the way you viewed yourself?

Have a volunteer read Psalm 34:18.

There is a moment in the movie when Alice says, “I am not suffering. I am struggling.” One thing that makes Alzheimer’s and other diseases so difficult is how hard it is on loved ones.  Sometimes the burden is far greater for the caregiver than the patient.

Alzheimer's caregivers frequently report experiencing high levels of stress. There’s social withdrawal from friends and activities, anxiety about the future. Sometimes there’s anger at the person with the disease, anger that no cure exists, anger that people don't understand what's happening, even anger at God, because this wasn’t how you planned your life.

Sometimes we think that if God loves you and you love God, something this bad won’t happen, but that’s just not true.  Since the beginning of time Godly men and women have suffered sickness and disease. The Bible says it rains on the just and the unjust.  But the Bible also teaches that God will never leave you, and you can never escape His love.

  • Have you ever experienced God’s presence in the midst of difficult circumstances in your life?

  • What is one circumstance in your life now where you want God to be with you?

Have a volunteer read Matthew 6:34.

Still Alice was based on a book of the same name, and in it Alice has a line that doesn’t appear in the movie: “My yesterdays are disappearing, and my tomorrows are uncertain. So what do I live for? I live for each day. I live in the moment.”

While a significant illness may make us dramatically aware of that truth, the reality is that it is true for all of us. Yesterday is gone, and none of us are promised tomorrow.  Jesus says tomorrow’s not worth the worry.

It’s a reminder to live for God today.  To love our family well today.  To serve others today.  To make the most of life today.   That’s what Alice decided to do. She decided to make the most of what little time she had left.

  • What changes do you need to make in order to make the most of your life right now, to live for God and others in the present?

Have a volunteer read Philippians 3:20-21.

We are citizens of heaven. That’s where we belong. That’s where your loved one ultimately belongs. And when we are in Christ, one day God will transform our lowly bodies, our Dementia filled minds, our Parkinson’s ridden hands, our cancer filled lymph nodes to be glorious, healthy heavenly bodies.

  • When you think of heaven, what comes to mind, and what is one thing you’re looking forward to in the afterlife?

Have a volunteer read 1 Corinthians 13:13.

As Alice sinks deeper into dementia, there is a moment she asks her daughter Lydia, “What if I see you, and I don’t know that you’re my daughter, and I don’t know that you love me?” “Then,” Lydia says, “I’ll tell you that I do, and you’ll believe me.”

Have you ever wondered why love is the greatest? Because, while you can leave a mark of faith, hope, and love on others after you pass from this life, love is the only one of the 3 qualities that’s going with you to the other side to life beyond the grave.

If you had faith in Jesus Christ in this life, you won’t need any faith when you get to heaven, because you’ll see Him face to face.

When you get to heaven, you won’t need any hope, because there’s no sickness, no tears, no disease, no Alzheimer’s in heaven.

But heaven is filled with love, because God is love, just as we see in Jesus. That’s why love is the greatest.

  • What is the greatest (or one of the greatest) acts of love you’ve ever experienced?

  • What are one or two practical, tangible things you can do to better love others?


Application

Those who find themselves, like Alice’s husband John, as the caregiver of a loved one who is gradually fading away have to endure emotional, physical and even spiritual attacks that no human being is meant to bear alone.  Caregivers need our encouragement daily, our love continually, and our unceasing prayers. We need to practice the “one anothers” of Scripture. Love one another (John 15). Serve one another in love (Galatians 5). Be kind and compassionate to one another (Ephesians 5). Pray for one another (James 5).

If there is someone in your group who is in a circumstance like this, how can your group rally around that group member to love and serve them?

If there is not, there is almost certainly a group member who knows someone in a circumstance like this.  How can your group rally around that person to love and serve them?

 

Week 2 - Rudy

Week 2 - Rudy

At the Movies is a series we do every year where we explore the Biblical truths we find in Hollywood movies.  So break out the popcorn.  It’s going to be an adventure!


Introduction

Note to Leaders: Watching this video is optional, but it may help give context to people who have not seen the movie or were not able to be at church.

Rudy is an uplifting story of determination and courage, based on the true story of Rudy Reutigger.  Rudy’s story is for anyone who has ever dared to dream; dared to move beyond the status quo; dared to believe God for more and greater things in your life but found the path painful and difficult.

  • What accomplishment in your life are you most proud of?

Rudy grew up in a blue-collar family in Joliet, Illinois. He dreamed of wearing the Notre Dame uniform, despite his lack of athletic and academic aptitude.  His family and friends all worked in the local steel mill, and without the grades to get into college, he takes a job there after high school.

His brother, his teachers, and even his parents told him to let go of his dream.  Only his best friend Pete continued to believe in him when no one else did.  And then when Pete died, Rudy was faced with the decision that we have all faced at some point in our lives: would he become bitter or better; would he give up or press on; would he quit or keep dreaming.

  • What is one significant challenge you have had to overcome in your own life, and how has overcoming that challenge shaped the person you are today?

  • Who is someone in your life who needs you to believe in them?

Have a volunteer read James 1:2-3.

The word that probably best describes Rudy is “perseverance.”  James writes that it is the difficult times in our lives that grow our character, that we should take joy in those things because they cause us to grow.

This is the great irony of life.  We try to avoid pain wherever we can.  It’s why our medicine cabinets are full of Advil for headache pain, Bengay for joint pain, and cough syrup for throat pain.  Yet pain is always the pathway to growth.

We all want gain with out pain.  We all wish we could be fit without exercise, wise without learning, CEO without ever taking an entry-level job, but the truth is that there’s no gain physically, relationally, professionally, educationally, or (especially) spiritually without pain.  Even for Jesus, there was no resurrection Sunday without the blood stained cross of Good Friday.

Rudy took advantage of his acceptance to Holy Cross, a community college across the street from Notre Dame. He worked hard, studied hard, and became a groundskeeper at the Notre Dame football field just to be near it.  Even though his application to Notre Dame was rejected again and again, he didn’t give up.

  • When is one time that perseverance has paid off for you?

  • Has there ever been a time that you persevered and didn’t achieve the result you hoped for?

  • What did these experiences teach you?

Have a volunteer read Isaiah 40:31.

There’s an old African proverb that says, “The problem with finding ivory, there’s always an elephant attached to it.”

Rudy gets accepted to Notre Dame, and through effort, drive and determination he manages to land on the practice team… where he becomes a tackling dummy for the rest of the time. And day after day he gets kicked, thrown, pushed, and bruised in practice.  But he keeps on as he waits and hopes for the opportunity to suit up and play in a game just once before he graduates.

All of us hate to wait, but many of us are in a season of waiting right now. We might dream of a loving relationship, well-adjusted kids, a better career, or finding meaning in life.  We’re tempted to leave our difficult marriage, explode at our kids, cut corners at work to get ahead, or seek meaning in all of the wrong places.

Rudy endeared himself to his team, showed up for practice after practice, took hit after hit, but he finally reached a breaking point.  He decided to quit the team when he didn’t make the cut to dress for the last game of his senior year.

  • Where in your life are you waiting for something to change? What has kept you from giving up?

Have a volunteer read Isaiah 40:31.

Rudy’s teammates go to bat for him with the coach.  They stick by him and help make his dream a reality.  There’s something powerful about others believing in your dream, speaking life into your dream, helping you achieve your dream.

  • Who in your life has been instrumental in helping you to achieve your dreams?

  • Who do you have in your life currently who you can rely on to support and encourage you?

  • How can this group help to support and encourage your dreams?


Application

Rarely do we look back at our lives relieved that we had given up on something. More often we look back with regret at giving up too soon.

What is the thing in your life that if you give up on it now you’ll look back with regret?  Your marriage? Your family? Your job? A friend? Your sobriety? Your faith?

Right now (yes, right here in the middle of small group) pull out your phone and text someone you trust. Make sure it’s someone who is wise and who loves Jesus.  Tell him or her that you need to talk about something important and ask if he or she has time to get together within the next few days. Don’t wait until you get home and can talk yourself out of doing this. Send the text right now so that you can’t get out of it.

We were never meant to face life’s challenges alone.  Share how you’re feeling and what you’re thinking with this person and ask for help to persevere.

Week 1 - Saving Mr. Banks

Week 1 - Saving Mr. Banks

Note to Leaders: This week’s message was all about letting go of a painful past, something that may be difficult for people to discuss if they don’t know each other very well yet.  If you’re leading a new group or a group that has recently had a large influx of new people, you might take the first meeting of the semester just to get to know each other, eat dinner, etc.  Don’t feel like you have to discuss this week’s sermon if it’s not a good fit.  Use your judgment as to whether or not it is appropriate for your group.


Series Introduction

At the Movies is a series we do every year where we explore the Biblical truths we find in Hollywood movies.  So break out the popcorn.  It’s going to be an adventure!


Introduction

Note to Leaders: Watching this video is optional, but it may help give context to people who have not seen the movie or were not able to be at church.

Saving Mr. Banks is based on the true story of Helen Goff, who wrote under her pen name Pamela Travers.  Her best-known book, Mary Poppins, touched the lives of so many people that Walt Disney himself decided the book must be turned into a movie, but the irrationally eccentric author refused to sell him the rights for 20 years, fearing he wouldn’t do justice to her beloved characters.  She only relented after being forced to do so due to dire financial circumstances.

  • What is something in your own life (besides your spouse or children) that is so important you would have a difficult time trusting someone else with it?

In every great story there is a story behind the story.  Pamela’s past relentlessly impacted her present. When you hear someone else’s story, you realize how their past impacts who they are, but your past should never limit who you can become.

  • How does your past impact your present and your future?  Sometimes when we ask questions like this we think only of how the negative things in our past harm our present and future.  Don’t ignore those things, but think also about how the positive things in your past are beneficial to you.

Have a volunteer read Isaiah 43:18-19

The death of Pamela’s father due to his alcoholism wasn’t her fault, but she somehow felt that she was responsible for his mistakes and carried that burden with her.  So many of us are paralyzed by our pasts, whether it’s something we did or something that was done to us.

Isaiah 43 teaches us that while you can’t change your past, you can let God change your future.  God wants to do a new thing in our lives and offers us hope, healing, forgiveness, and grace.

What is one area of your life where you think God might want to do a new thing?

Have a volunteer read Philippians 3:13-14.

Pamela is finally able to let go of the past and move on with her life.  God wants us to do the same by embracing a relationship with Jesus.  Through that relationship, we have the Holy Spirit, and the Holy Spirit brings us the fruit of the Spirit: love, joy, peace, patience, kindness, goodness, faithfulness, gentleness, and self-control.

  • Which of these nine fruit of the Spirit do you want God to grow in your life, and why is that one important to you?

In a particularly vulnerable moment, Walt Disney opens up about his own demanding and harsh father.  While Walt loved his father, he decided not to let his father’s challenging nature dictate his own future.

  • How might your life be different if you forgave and let go of the past?


Application

Letting go of the difficult things in our past isn’t often easy.  We’re rarely able to do it all at once, and we can’t do it without help from people we trust.  This week set aside some time to make an action plan for how you can continue the process of letting go of your past.

You’ll probably have a few things in mind that you want to include in your plan, and below are a few more to consider.  When writing your plan, be specific on what you will do, when you will do it, how often you will do it, who you will do it with, etc.  Non-specific plans rarely succeed.

  • Sharing your struggles with a close friend.

  • Continuing to check in with that friend on a regular basis.

  • Seeing a counselor.

  • Attending a support group.  (We have a number of groups at Eastside that may be helpful to you: eastside.com/careandrecovery)

  • Reaching out to someone from your past to ask for forgiveness.